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Notes on video lecture:
1970s: Hippie Aesthetic, Corporate Rock, Disco, and Punk
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
musicianship, standard, specialized, FM, cleanest, Altamont, venues, visceral, albums, continuous, friction, teenie, AM, ambitious, psychedelia, psychedelic, matured, serious, Beach, sophisticated, mega, challenges, perfection, business, movements, hip, homogenized, corporations, ability, black, asked
the 60s and 70s
many music historians make a break at 1969 with Woodstock and                 
the end of                        era with something new happening in the 70s
but in many ways the late sixties and the 70s can be seen as a                      piece music history
overview of the 1970s
the rise of musically                    groups
most groups playing music in the 70s were:
concerned with being taken                as professionals
had a certain standard level of professional               
even the                  rather than cerebral type players
although punk and disco music comes along at the end of the 70s and                      this notion
what's different about the 70s
while many genres of music were being mixed together in the                        of the late 1960s including rock, world music, jazz, country and few people were concerned with these as being                        areas of music
in the 70s these get divided up into separate styles such as country rock and progressive rock and jazz rock
you can think of it in terms of the cover of Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon with 1960's psychedelia as the white light coming into the pyramid containing all kinds of stylistic elements
then on the way out of the pyramid into the 70s you get a break down into all of these different kinds of specialized styles
           rock was still quite separate
not many white people listening to rock radio who knew about black music extensively
general                    in 70s music
rise of ambitious bands
taken more as professional musicians
the punk reaction to that
the disco phenomenon
parallel track of black pop
rock is becoming a bigger and bigger                 
second half of 70s, bands selling many more records
corporate rock
rock music that uses large arena             , particularly sports venues, for concerts or series of concerts linked in tours
         albums
people started selling albums at a volume that no one thought would ever be possible
brought multinational                          into the business
music began to play a safer game
became less ambitious,                        and listener friendly
rock business grows incredibly over the course of the 70s
albums and singles become separate markets
already happening in 1967 and 1968
albums are what go to the      radio band
singles, which had been the commodity throughout the beginning years of rock and roll
relegated mostly to the      band
AM was hit song radio, singles
FM radio becomes bands that are mostly selling             
in the early 1970s, if you really cared about the band, you bought the albums
people who bought singles were:
superficial listeners
seen as people who had not                to the level of buying albums
AM was often dismissed as being sell-out, commercial,             -bopper
FM was were the real action was
stylistic spectrum expanded in the 1970s
Jazz
Folk
Indian
Classic
Avant-Garde
the Hippie Aesthetic
a rock musician thinks of himself as an artist who has a responsibility to create                            music
not just playing what you are            to play
not constructing songs for a teen or        market
you are writing and performing your own music
at the highest level of technical                      that you can
proud of your                         
using the best technology to create the                  possible recordings
you don't want to be seen as someone who keeps doing the same things over and over
you want your new material to go places you haven't gone before
began in the 1960s
The Beatles, the            Boys, and Bob Dillon pushing the idea rock musician artist
continues into the 70s and becomes the                  model of rock music in the 70s
this is going to be the                  with disco, and to a certain degree, punk, at the end of the decade

Spelling Corrections:

psychodelicpsychedelic
relagatedrelegated

Ideas and Concepts:

Music metaphor of the day via this evening's History of Rock and Roll class: "One main difference between music of the late 60s and the music of the early 70s is that while many genres of music were being mixed together in the psychedelia of the late 1960s including rock, world music, jazz, and country, few people were concerned with these as being specialized areas of music in themselves. Yet in the 70s each of these genres gets divided up into separate styles such as country rock, progressive rock, and jazz rock. You can think of this in terms of the cover of Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon album where the 1960's psychedelia movement, with all of its stylistic elements, is the white light coming into the pyramid which represents Woodstock and Altamont in 1969, then on the way out of the pyramid you get a sharp break down of this rough musical mixture into all of the specialized and separate styles of the 70s."
Music history vocabulary of the day via this morning's History of Rock and Roll class:

"corporate rock, n. rock music that uses large arena venues, particularly sports venues, for concerts or series of concerts linked in tours. Historically, corporate rock bands have often come from the hard rock, heavy metal and progressive rock genres, using a more commercially oriented and radio-friendly sound.

The origins of corporate rock were in the 1960s, sometimes dated to when The Beatles played Shea Stadium in New York in 1965. Early bands experiencing success in this genre included The Rolling Stones, Grand Funk Railroad and Led Zeppelin.

The tendency developed in the mid-1970s as the increased power of amplification and sound systems allowed the use of larger and larger venues. Smoke, fireworks and sophisticated lighting shows became staples of arena rock performances.

It has been argued that the rise of corporate rock marked the end of the idealism of the 1960s, particularly in the disillusionment that followed the Altamont Free Concert of 1969, for a more commercial form of rock.

Key acts included Journey, REO Speedwagon, Foreigner, Styx, Kiss, Peter Frampton, Boston, and Queen. The commercialism, and overblown spectacle of stadium rock has been seen as promoting a number of reactions such as the punk rock movements in the 1970s.

In the 1980s, corporate rock became dominated by glam metal bands (bands which combined rock and punk), following the lead of Aerosmith and including Mötley Crüe, Quiet Riot, W.A.S.P. and Ratt."
On the Hippie Aesthetic in 1970s Rock and Roll, via this evening's History of Rock and Roll class: "In the early 1970s, a rock musician thought of himself primarily as an artist who had a responsibility to create sophisticated music, not just play what he was asked to play, not just construct songs for a teen or hip market, but write and perform his own music at the highest level of technical perfection that he could, using the best technology available to create the cleanest possible recordings. You didn't want to be seen as someone who kept doing the same things over and over, you wanted your new material to go places you hadn't gone before. This adherence to authenticity and quality had begun in the 1960s with The Beatles, the Beach Boys, and Bob Dillon who pushed the idea of rock musician artist, and it continued into the 70s becoming the standard model of rock music of the decade, eventually becoming a friction with disco, and to a certain degree, punk, towards the end of the decade."
1970s: Hippie Aesthetic, Corporate Rock, Disco, and Punk
British Blues-Based Bands and the Roots of Heavy Metal
American Blues Rock and Southern Rock
The Era of Progressive Rock
Jazz Rock in the 70s
Theatrical Rock: KISS, Bowie, and Alice Cooper
American Singer-Songwriters of the 70s
British and Canadian Singer-Songwriters
Country Rock's Influence on 1970s Music
Black Pop in the 1970s
Sly Stone and His Influence on Black Pop, Funk, and Psychedelic Soul
Motown in the 1970s
Philadelphia Sound and Soul Train
Blaxploitation Soundtracks
The Uniqueness of James Brown
Bob Marley and the Rise of Reggae
The Backlash Against Disco
1975-1980: The Rise of the Mega-Αlbum
Continuity Bands in the 1970s
Rock and Roll in the Second Half of the 1970s
U.S. Punk 1967-1975
1974-77: Punk in the UK
American New Wave 1977-80
British New Wave 1977-80
The Hippie Aesthetic: 1966-1980
The Rise of MTV
Michael Jackson: MTV's Unexpected Boon
Madonna as Disruptive Shock Artist
Prince and Janet Jackson
Other Groups Who Benefited from MTV
1980s New Traditionalists and New Wave
1980s New Acts, Old Styles and Blue-Eyed Soul
1970s Progressive Rock Adapts to the 80s
1980's Heavy Metal
1980s Heavy Metal and L.A. Hair Bands
1980s Ambitious Heavy Metal
The Beginning of Rap
1980s: Rap Crosses Over to Mainstream
Late 1980s Hard Core Rap
Punk Goes Hardcore
Late 80s Indie Rock Underground
1990s: The Rise of Alternative Rock
1990s Indie Rock and the Question of Selling Out
1990s Metal and Alternative Extensions
Hip-Hop in the 1990s
Classic Rock of the 1990s
1990s Jam Bands and Britpop
Female Singer-Songwriters of the 1990s
The Rise of Teen Idols in the 1990s
1990s Dance Music