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Notes on video lecture:
1980s New Traditionalists and New Wave
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
Eno, Jung, rotation, Woody, distorted, past, 1970s, Glory, poetical, Knopfler, vocalist, hippy, emphasis, England, popularity, tradition, really, simplicity, quotation, roots, social, Moon, Americana, rebellious, Stratocaster, Byrds, romanticized, Springsteen, three, surrealistic, conscience, ironically, Westerner, Swing, older
the rise of New Wave at the end of the           
a signal event in the sense that it helped define the end of the decade that was pushing back and rejecting the            aesthetic, which unified Rock music from the mid-60s to the end of the 1970s
New Wave into the 1980s had            main groups
1. those who turned to the          in an ironic or detached way
not that you want to return to the past but that you are using the past because you know that your audience understands what that is so it is in                    marks distanced from your values and intentions
2. those who were not using the past ironically at all and just blended in to 80s music
by the time you get to the early 80s, New Wave blended into main stream Rock and was no longer                     
you could hear the Cars, Foreigners, The Talking Heads, and Boston all pretty much together on classic Rock radio
there might have been a difference in                  but not a difference in kind when it came to style
3. those who              wanted to go back to and celebrate the past authentically, "New Traditionalists"
a return to the past and a return to the roots of the                   
Tom Petty and the Heart Breakers
wanted his group to sound like an updated version of the           
he wasn't doing this                     , he just thought this was they way good music should sound
influenced by Dylan
a lot of jingly, jangly guitars
pop hooks, three-to-four minute songs
he really believes in the tradition of mid-60s American rock and roll
1985 Southern Accents
"Don't Come Around Here No More"
1989 Full          Fever
"Free Fallin
had videos to go along with them
e.g. Tom Petty is the Mad Hatter who is cutting Alice who is the cake,                         
but they did not even know MTV very well even though their video was playing on it
New Traditionalists that embraced                   
idealistic idea of what America is in a kind of fly-over country
that basic, kind of, good-sense, wheat-fed America, a                          notion of a country that probably doesn't exist, but it's an idea that people have
a bit like the New York that is portrayed in            Allen film, if you were to go to New York expecting to find what you had seen in those films, you are bound to be a little bit disappointed
Bruce                       
a singer/song-writer at the end of the 70s
but as he went on, he really got into a rootsy, New Traditionalist, a return to                     , a return to the past
a romantic view of the 1960s, growing up in New Jersey and this kind of thing
the image of a working class guy who talks good sense
1975: Born to Run
1980: The River
Hungry Heart
1984: Born in the USA
           Days
both of these tunes became radio staples
much video on MTV to support him
John Cougar Mellencamp
projects the image of a small-town mid-                  
1979: I need a Lover
1982: American Fool
Hurts So Good
Jack and Diane
it may be easier to think of him as a singer/song-writer fronting a band
a traditionalist embracing            values
returning to good, simple, direct music
New Traditionalists from               
Dire Straits
Mark                 
voice from a Bob Dylan tradition
playing a                          guitar, a very clean sound
very different than the cranked-up, distorted Marshall stacks that other bands were using
1978: Sultans of           
defined Dire Straits as a group that was going back to the            and bypassing a lot of heavier Rock of the day
1985: Brothers in Arms
Money for Nothing
plenty of                    guitar
an embrace of American roots music
a criticism of music merchandising
but went into heavy                  on MTV
New Wave and how it merged into mainstream rock in the 1980s
The Police
sophisticated musical arrangements that use                  and intellectual lyrics
1983 Synchronicity
Carl         
Every Breath You Take
King of Pain
U2
rose as the                      of the Police was beginning to die down
the move from the Police to U2 were stage 1 and stage 2 of similar approaches, even though they are very distinctive bands
simple songs in very innovative ways
Bono
a pursuer of              causes
a voice of                     
trying to use his fame to affect positive change
The Edge
David Howell Evans, born 8 August 1961, a British-born Irish musician and songwriter best known as the lead guitarist, keyboardist and backing                 
1987 The Joshua Tree
producers
Brian       
Daniel Lanois
"With or Without You"
In the Name of Love

Flashcards:

kind of guitar Mark Knopfler had for Dire Straits
Stratocaster

Ideas and Concepts:

Music that brings back my American youth, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class:

"New Wave into the 1980s had three main groups:1. those who turned to the past in an ironic or detached way (Talking Heads, B52s), 2. those who were not using the past ironically at all and just blended in to 80s music (The Cars), and 3. those who really wanted to go back to and celebrate the past authentically, which we call the New Traditionalists. The foremost singer in this group was, of course, Tom Petty. He truly wanted his group to sound like an updated version of the Byrds. He wasn't doing this ironically, he just thought this was the way good music should sound:lots of jingly, jangly guitars, pop hooks, and three-to-four minute songs. Influenced by Bob Dylan, Tom simply believed in the tradition of mid-60s American rock and roll, and there's no better song to demonstrate this than Free Fallin':

"She's a good girl, loves her mama, Loves Jesus and America, too, She's a good girl, crazy 'bout Elvis, Loves horses and her boyfriend, too, It's a long day living in Reseda, There's a freeway runnin' through the yard, I'm a bad boy 'cause I don't even miss her, I'm a bad boy for breaking her heart, And I'm free, free fallin'."
On early 1980 New Traditionalist bands going back to the roots, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "While Bruce Springsteen and John Cougar Mellencamp were embracing Americana, a kind of good-sense, wheat-fed notion of America, a romanticized version of a country that probably didn't exist, a bit like the New York that Woody Allen portrays in his films, Dire Straights in England was simply going back to the musical roots of the sixties, bypassing the heavier Rock of the day. Lead singer Mark Knopfler, with his voice of Bob Dylan tradition, played a Stratocaster guitar, which guitar enthusiasts know to make a very sharp, crisp and clean sound, much more sophisticated than the cranked-up, distorted Marshall stacks that other bands of the 80s were indulging in, and there is no better song to demonstrate this crispness of sound than their 1978 hit:Sultans of Swing."
Beautiful poetry by Sting, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class:

"Sting's fascination with Carl Jung and to a greater extent Arthur Koestler inspired him to write this track. As a Hungarian-born novelist who resided in England, Koestler was enthralled with parapsychology and the unexplained workings of the mind. This song is a very sad poem about doing everything right and still being in trouble and not knowing what to do next.

There's a fossil that's trapped in a high cliff wall, that's my soul up there. There's a dead salmon frozen in a waterfall, that's my soul up there. There's a blue whale beached by a springtime's ebb, that's my soul up there. There's a butterfly trapped in a spider's web, that's my soul up there. There's a red fox torn by a huntsman's pack, that's my soul up there. There's a black-winged gull with a broken back, that's my soul up there.

There's a king on a throne with his eyes torn out. There's a blind man looking for a shadow of doubt. There's a rich man sleeping on a golden bed. There's a skeleton choking on a crust of bread. There's a little black spot on the sun today. It's the same old thing as yesterday. King of pain."
Music of my 80s youth, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class:

"U2 rose to popularity as the popularity of the Police was beginning to wane. The move from the Police to U2 was like stage one and stage two of similar approaches, even though they are very distinctive bands. They both has simple yet innovative songs which spoke to the soul.

Bono (Paul David Hewson), lead vocalist of U2, was a pursuer of social causes, a voice of conscience, trying to use his fame to affect positive change.

The song "In the Name of Love" was a tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr. Bono is speaking about those throughout history who have died because they preached of the equality of all men and practiced nonviolence as the only way to achieve their goal of having this equality universally recognized.

Martin Luther King Jr. is the primary example of nonviolent resistance as the only way to bring about changes in civil rights. The song is about singular people who lived their life with pride, not in a boastful way, but with the pride a person has when their thoughts and actions are motivated by their understanding and full awareness of the dignity and sanctity of human life."
Wisdom in music, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "Bono wrote the lyrics to With or Without You during his first night visiting Côte d’Azur in 1986, while struggling to reconcile his responsibilities as both a married man and a musician. His wanderlust in belonging to a musical act was often at odds with his domestic life. While writing the lyrics, he realized that neither facet of his life defined him, but rather the tension between the two did. He explained that the final lyric is about torment and how repressing desires only makes them stronger."
1970s: Hippie Aesthetic, Corporate Rock, Disco, and Punk
British Blues-Based Bands and the Roots of Heavy Metal
American Blues Rock and Southern Rock
The Era of Progressive Rock
Jazz Rock in the 70s
Theatrical Rock: KISS, Bowie, and Alice Cooper
American Singer-Songwriters of the 70s
British and Canadian Singer-Songwriters
Country Rock's Influence on 1970s Music
Black Pop in the 1970s
Sly Stone and His Influence on Black Pop, Funk, and Psychedelic Soul
Motown in the 1970s
Philadelphia Sound and Soul Train
Blaxploitation Soundtracks
The Uniqueness of James Brown
Bob Marley and the Rise of Reggae
The Backlash Against Disco
1975-1980: The Rise of the Mega-Αlbum
Continuity Bands in the 1970s
Rock and Roll in the Second Half of the 1970s
U.S. Punk 1967-1975
1974-77: Punk in the UK
American New Wave 1977-80
British New Wave 1977-80
The Hippie Aesthetic: 1966-1980
The Rise of MTV
Michael Jackson: MTV's Unexpected Boon
Madonna as Disruptive Shock Artist
Prince and Janet Jackson
Other Groups Who Benefited from MTV
1980s New Traditionalists and New Wave
1980s New Acts, Old Styles and Blue-Eyed Soul
1970s Progressive Rock Adapts to the 80s
1980's Heavy Metal
1980s Heavy Metal and L.A. Hair Bands
1980s Ambitious Heavy Metal
The Beginning of Rap
1980s: Rap Crosses Over to Mainstream
Late 1980s Hard Core Rap
Punk Goes Hardcore
Late 80s Indie Rock Underground
1990s: The Rise of Alternative Rock
1990s Indie Rock and the Question of Selling Out
1990s Metal and Alternative Extensions
Hip-Hop in the 1990s
Classic Rock of the 1990s
1990s Jam Bands and Britpop
Female Singer-Songwriters of the 1990s
The Rise of Teen Idols in the 1990s
1990s Dance Music