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Notes on video lecture:
1980s Heavy Metal and L.A. Hair Bands
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
sensitive, Jungle, extreme, ridiculous, balance, virtuosic, popular, lecherous, Prayer, Headbangers, Axl, tempo, womens, cheesy, 1987, intending, teased, chords, Dirty, Boston, big, Jersey, Motorhead, glam, drag, power, Sambora, sexist
heavy metal hits the        time
bands from the first half of the 80s had decent success
Van Halen
                  
but there wasn't really a move toward heavy metal yet
second half of the 80s, heavy metal becomes much more               
two bands that started off this trend, but not particularly thought of now as heavy metal
Bon Jovi
New             
Jon Bon Jovi
Ritchie               
1986 Slippery When Wet
many of the features of heavy metal rock from early 80s
"You Give Love a Bad Name"
"Livin' On a             "
"Wanted Dead of Alive"
created a momentum that other groups were able to emulate
Guns and Roses
Los Angeles
       Rose
Slash
         Appetite for Destruction
that was the album that tipped the                for heavy metal
today not perceived so much as heavy metal
"Welcome to the             "
"Sweet Child o' Mine"
"Paradise City"
1987                        Ball
on MTV
playing nothing but Heavy Metal
L.A. Hair Bands
bands that are         -influenced in their use of clothing, bands that have this spandex thing going with feathered boas, leopard-skin vests, and all this kind of stuff starts to show up
and make-up, and I don't just mean make-up to accent their eyes but make-up like             ' makeup, heavy makeup
they've got              hair, they have long hair and its flowing down and it all gets kind of teased up
a distinct look that celebrates less glamour per se as in the 1970s, but a cheap kind of glamour more associated with strip clubs and              bars
that's the kind of stuff they were embracing
it's not that they didn't know how to do the more sophisticated glamour kind of thing, they were embracing this element of the low night life
this is what these bands were standing for
Mötley Crüe
a type of L.A. Hair Band
Poison
took it to an               
1986 Look What the Cat Dragged In
Talk            to Me
a good representative of Hair Bands
a compact form
not a long, extended tune
has a                    guitar solo, but not too long
             lyrics typify Hair Bands, sexually predatory                    kind of attitude, almost exaggerated in cartoonish proportions
1988 Open Up and Say...Ahh!
Every Rose Has Its Thorn
the            ballad
arose out of the 1970s from e.g.             's more than a feeling
every metal band has got to have the one tune, where the lead guitarist would pick up a 12-string guitar and start to play some open              in a kind of stairway to heaven moment
and the lead singer sort of shows his                    side
yeah, I may pursue women and drink hard, but heck, I'm a sensitive guy, too
then they sort of do that whole sensitive guy thing for a minute
usually about two-thirds the way through the show to slow down the            before it picked up again for the grand finale
in spite of the fact that these heavy metal L.A. hair bands seemed to dress up like women, almost as if they were in         , it had the effect of actually attracting more women somehow
they actually had a strong female following
in spite of the fact that that is probably not what they were                   
often when people make fun of stadium Heavy Metal from the 80s, what they are really making fun of are the Hair Bands from L.A. because they think bits of it were                     
Warrant
Winger
Skid Row

Ideas and Concepts:

From the primal scream department, memories of the 80s via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "By the mid 80s, heavy metal really hadn't taken off as a major industry, but Guns N' Roses 1987 album Appetite for Destruction was the album that tipped the balance to make heavy metal a major industry, reaching number one on the Billboard 200 a year after its release. The album has sold approximately 30 million copies worldwide, including 18 million units in the United States, making it the best-selling debut album of all time in the U.S. Guns N' Roses has been credited with reviving the mainstream popularity of rock music, at a time when popular music was dominated by dance music and glam metal. Alx Rose, Slash and team brought forth a hedonistic rebelliousness reminiscent of the early Rolling Stones, a reputation that earned the group the nickname the most dangerous band in the world."
From the 1980s unfortunate musical genre department, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "L.A. Hair Bands were bands that were glam-influenced in their use of clothing, most of them had a kind of spandex thing going with feathered boas, leopard-skin vests, and all this kind of stuff starts to show up. And they had makeup, and I don't just mean makeup to accent their eyes but makeup like womens' makeup, heavy makeup. They had teased hair, this long hair and it's flowing down and it all gets kind of teased up. In general, they had a distinct look that celebrated less glamour per se as in the 1970s, but a cheap kind of glamour more associated with lowly strip clubs and cheesy bars. That's the kind of stuff they were embracing. It's not that they didn't know how to do the more sophisticated glamour kind of thing, they were just embracing this element of the low night life. This is what these bands stood for."
On the Heavy Metal power ballad, via tonight's History of Rock class: "The Heavy Metal power ballad arose out of the 1970s from songs such as Boston's More Than a Feeling. Every 1980s Metal Band had to have one of these, where the lead guitarist would pick up a 12-string guitar and start to play some open chords in a kind of Stairway to Heaven moment, and the lead singer would sort of show his sensitive side, as if to say, yeah, I may pursue women and drink hard, but heck, I'm a sensitive guy, too, and then they would all sort of do this whole sensitive guy thing for a while. The power ballad would usually be played about two-thirds the way through a show to slow down the tempo before it picked up again for the grand finale. And if there was one typical 1980s Heavy Metal power ballad, it was Poison's Every Rose Has Its Thorn."
On ironic and ludicrous musical genres, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "In spite of the fact that these Heavy Metal L.A. Hair Bands seemed to dress up like women, almost as if they were in drag, it had the effect of actually attracting more women somehow. They actually had a strong female following in spite of the fact that this was probably not what they were intending. Often when people make fun of stadium Heavy Metal from the 1980s, what they are really making fun of are the Hair Bands from Los Angeles because they think what these bands were doing and what they stood for was ridiculous."
1970s: Hippie Aesthetic, Corporate Rock, Disco, and Punk
British Blues-Based Bands and the Roots of Heavy Metal
American Blues Rock and Southern Rock
The Era of Progressive Rock
Jazz Rock in the 70s
Theatrical Rock: KISS, Bowie, and Alice Cooper
American Singer-Songwriters of the 70s
British and Canadian Singer-Songwriters
Country Rock's Influence on 1970s Music
Black Pop in the 1970s
Sly Stone and His Influence on Black Pop, Funk, and Psychedelic Soul
Motown in the 1970s
Philadelphia Sound and Soul Train
Blaxploitation Soundtracks
The Uniqueness of James Brown
Bob Marley and the Rise of Reggae
The Backlash Against Disco
1975-1980: The Rise of the Mega-Αlbum
Continuity Bands in the 1970s
Rock and Roll in the Second Half of the 1970s
U.S. Punk 1967-1975
1974-77: Punk in the UK
American New Wave 1977-80
British New Wave 1977-80
The Hippie Aesthetic: 1966-1980
The Rise of MTV
Michael Jackson: MTV's Unexpected Boon
Madonna as Disruptive Shock Artist
Prince and Janet Jackson
Other Groups Who Benefited from MTV
1980s New Traditionalists and New Wave
1980s New Acts, Old Styles and Blue-Eyed Soul
1970s Progressive Rock Adapts to the 80s
1980's Heavy Metal
1980s Heavy Metal and L.A. Hair Bands
1980s Ambitious Heavy Metal
The Beginning of Rap
1980s: Rap Crosses Over to Mainstream
Late 1980s Hard Core Rap
Punk Goes Hardcore
Late 80s Indie Rock Underground
1990s: The Rise of Alternative Rock
1990s Indie Rock and the Question of Selling Out
1990s Metal and Alternative Extensions
Hip-Hop in the 1990s
Classic Rock of the 1990s
1990s Jam Bands and Britpop
Female Singer-Songwriters of the 1990s
The Rise of Teen Idols in the 1990s
1990s Dance Music