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Notes on video lecture:
Sly Stone and His Influence on Black Pop, Funk, and Psychedelic Soul
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
Funk, Airplane, Psychedelic, Night, Latino, white, Rider, catchy, two, Jazz, Burdon, horn, extension, percussion, Life, drums, Beatles, Chess, Pepper, Ohio, groove, gender, ethnic, Brown
       names that helped shape black pop throughout the 1970s
1. James           
2. Sly Stone
Sly and the Family Stone
led to a rise of         
comes out of the primarily white rock scene in San Francisco at the end of the 1960s, with:
Grateful Dead
Jefferson                 
Janice Joplin
not really thought of as a San Francisco band
responsible for a genre one can call                        Soul
emphasis on             , setting up a kind of repeated, rhythmic kind of feel that is laid down between the base and the           
not so much like melodic instruments but more like every instrument in the band is a                      instrument
an interlocking of different parts which creates a groove, and all the music sort of rides on top of that
there are              lyrics that are hooks that catch the listener's ear
that sound is developed by Sly Stone
1968: Dance to the Music
1969: Stand
1969: I Want to Take You Higher
was marketed across              lines
was an exception
did a lot to form the opinion of            audiences of what black music sounded like even though they may not have been hearing a whole lot of it
group was integrated in term of race and             
a whole series of groups which took up the format that Sly Stone had started
         Players
started in 1959
1973: Funky Worm
a funny lyric and vocal and a synthesizer sound that was supposed to be the sound of the worm grooving
a catchy AM novelty record
1974: Fire
1975: Love Roller coaster
Kool and the Gang
an important                    of the Sly Stone style
1964 formed as the Jazziacs
1973 ALBUM: Wild and Peaceful
Jungle Boogie
Hollywood Swinging
later had big hits in disco later in the 1970s
1979 Ladies           
1980 Celebration
Earth, Wind, and Fire
an extension of what Sly Stone got going
Maurice White
1960s            Records
1969 moved to L.A.
sophisticated and intricate          arrangements in addition to catchy melodies that rode on top of these grooves
1975: ALBUM: That's the Way of the World
written for the movie of the same name
Shining Star
1978 Got to Get You Into My         
their version of the                song
highlights all the things that are hippest
recorded for Sgt.              Movie
Bee Gees
Peter Frampton
Steve Martin also in movie
Tower of Power
had fantastic horn section
Oakland, California
Black, White, and              members
1973 ALBUM: Tower of Power
What is Hip?
had a          flavor
War
Los Angeles
originally "The Nightriders"
had a gig to back Deacon Jones
Eric Burdon
asked War to back him
1970 Spill the Wine
group continued on without Eric             
had Latin feels with R&B and funk
1972 Cisco Kid
1975 Low           

Ideas and Concepts:

From the Psychedelic Soul department via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "Sly Stone comes out of the primarily white rock scene in San Francisco at the end of the 1960s which produced bands such as The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, and Janis Joplin, but he was never really thought of as a San Francisco band. Sly Stone was responsible for a genre one can call Psychedelic Soul which had an emphasis on groove, setting up a kind of repeated, rhythmic kind of feel that is laid down between the base and the drums, not so much using melodic instruments but more like using every instrument in the band is a percussion instrument, an interlocking of different parts which creates a groove, and all the music sort of rides on top of that, with catchy lyrics that are hooks that catch the listener's ear, this was the sound that was developed by Sly Stone."
1970s: Hippie Aesthetic, Corporate Rock, Disco, and Punk
British Blues-Based Bands and the Roots of Heavy Metal
American Blues Rock and Southern Rock
The Era of Progressive Rock
Jazz Rock in the 70s
Theatrical Rock: KISS, Bowie, and Alice Cooper
American Singer-Songwriters of the 70s
British and Canadian Singer-Songwriters
Country Rock's Influence on 1970s Music
Black Pop in the 1970s
Sly Stone and His Influence on Black Pop, Funk, and Psychedelic Soul
Motown in the 1970s
Philadelphia Sound and Soul Train
Blaxploitation Soundtracks
The Uniqueness of James Brown
Bob Marley and the Rise of Reggae
The Backlash Against Disco
1975-1980: The Rise of the Mega-Αlbum
Continuity Bands in the 1970s
Rock and Roll in the Second Half of the 1970s
U.S. Punk 1967-1975
1974-77: Punk in the UK
American New Wave 1977-80
British New Wave 1977-80
The Hippie Aesthetic: 1966-1980
The Rise of MTV
Michael Jackson: MTV's Unexpected Boon
Madonna as Disruptive Shock Artist
Prince and Janet Jackson
Other Groups Who Benefited from MTV
1980s New Traditionalists and New Wave
1980s New Acts, Old Styles and Blue-Eyed Soul
1970s Progressive Rock Adapts to the 80s
1980's Heavy Metal
1980s Heavy Metal and L.A. Hair Bands
1980s Ambitious Heavy Metal
The Beginning of Rap
1980s: Rap Crosses Over to Mainstream
Late 1980s Hard Core Rap
Punk Goes Hardcore
Late 80s Indie Rock Underground
1990s: The Rise of Alternative Rock
1990s Indie Rock and the Question of Selling Out
1990s Metal and Alternative Extensions
Hip-Hop in the 1990s
Classic Rock of the 1990s
1990s Jam Bands and Britpop
Female Singer-Songwriters of the 1990s
The Rise of Teen Idols in the 1990s
1990s Dance Music