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Notes on video lecture:
The Uniqueness of James Brown
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
fun, Clinton, impresario, Brown, stylistic, seventies, edified, White, FM, threatening, funk, groove, Stone, Motown, Blaxploitation, Scotland, model, KISS, influence, mathematical, Funkadelic, experimental, Bag, Cake, horns, black
the two founding fathers of          and black pop in the 1970s
1. Sly           
2. James           
came out of 1950s into 1960s
            -based approach
interesting kind of aggressive yet absolutely non-                       vocal approach with outrageous phrases as the key lyric
you wouldn't listen to these songs to be                by the lyrics
these are not singer-songwriter lyrics, where the instruments line up in a                          way but that makes it sound like it is heartless and cold but that's far from what it is
everything sort of locks together in an intricate arrangement just filled with feel and James Brown and his band is certainly the ones for establishing the            for this where Sly Stone was coming from when he was putting his group together
1965: Papa's Got a Brand New       
1965: I Feel Good
extended and increased his interest in Funk during the 1970s, plenty of           , focus on the groove
1970 Super Bad
1974 The Payback
#1 R&B hit
written for a                              file for "Hell Up in Harlem"
rejected for being the same ol' James Brown song
George               
the most obvious                    of James Brown in the 1970s
his groups:
Parliament
Funkadelic
blends the                    elements of James Brown
and the business approach of Berry Gordy
became a kind of                     , assigning his groups to different labels
born in New Jersey, moved to Detroit in 1960s
did some work for             
Parliaments
due to dispute about "Parliaments", he called them                     
after court case was resolved, he had two groups
Parliaments: more commercial
Funkadelic: more                          group to try out new, crazy ideas
1970 Osmium album
1974 Up for the Down Stroke
Casablanca label
also managed         
Funkadelics
1974 Mothership Connection
Tear the Roof Off the Sucker
celebrates the roof
stage show
space ship that came down
costumes
sophisticated theatrics for the early                   
there was always a sense that they were just having        with these ideas
Average            Band
a group that played in the same genre as Sly Stone, James Brown, and George Clinton, but a group you would hear on      radio
formed in                  in 1972
1974 album AWB was a number one album in the United States
Pick up the Pieces, a #1 hit single
1975 Cut the         
stood for what white listeners though must be going on in            pop

Ideas and Concepts:

Early James Brown (1966) via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "What staging, what hair, what a drop to the knees, what a primal scream!"
Pure originality via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "James Brown, who came out of 1950s into 1960s with his groove-based approach, had an aggressive yet absolutely non-threatening vocal approach with outrageous phrases as the key lyric, you wouldn't listen to these songs to be edified by the lyrics, these are not singer-songwriter lyrics, but what you get are gyrating performances where the instruments line up in a almost a mathematical way, but that makes it sound like it is heartless and cold, but that's far from what it is, everything sort of locks together in and intricate arrangement just filled with feel and James Brown and his band are certainly the ones for establishing the model for this, somewhere that Sly Stone was coming from when he was putting his group together."
From the 1970s cultural-boundary-crossing band department via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "Next up we have some super talented young men from Scotland and one from England who all play and sing like they were raised on corn bread an black-eyed peas, it's something that has to be seen to be believed, let's get some hands together, gang, for The Average White Band."
1970s: Hippie Aesthetic, Corporate Rock, Disco, and Punk
British Blues-Based Bands and the Roots of Heavy Metal
American Blues Rock and Southern Rock
The Era of Progressive Rock
Jazz Rock in the 70s
Theatrical Rock: KISS, Bowie, and Alice Cooper
American Singer-Songwriters of the 70s
British and Canadian Singer-Songwriters
Country Rock's Influence on 1970s Music
Black Pop in the 1970s
Sly Stone and His Influence on Black Pop, Funk, and Psychedelic Soul
Motown in the 1970s
Philadelphia Sound and Soul Train
Blaxploitation Soundtracks
The Uniqueness of James Brown
Bob Marley and the Rise of Reggae
The Backlash Against Disco
1975-1980: The Rise of the Mega-Αlbum
Continuity Bands in the 1970s
Rock and Roll in the Second Half of the 1970s
U.S. Punk 1967-1975
1974-77: Punk in the UK
American New Wave 1977-80
British New Wave 1977-80
The Hippie Aesthetic: 1966-1980
The Rise of MTV
Michael Jackson: MTV's Unexpected Boon
Madonna as Disruptive Shock Artist
Prince and Janet Jackson
Other Groups Who Benefited from MTV
1980s New Traditionalists and New Wave
1980s New Acts, Old Styles and Blue-Eyed Soul
1970s Progressive Rock Adapts to the 80s
1980's Heavy Metal
1980s Heavy Metal and L.A. Hair Bands
1980s Ambitious Heavy Metal
The Beginning of Rap
1980s: Rap Crosses Over to Mainstream
Late 1980s Hard Core Rap
Punk Goes Hardcore
Late 80s Indie Rock Underground
1990s: The Rise of Alternative Rock
1990s Indie Rock and the Question of Selling Out
1990s Metal and Alternative Extensions
Hip-Hop in the 1990s
Classic Rock of the 1990s
1990s Jam Bands and Britpop
Female Singer-Songwriters of the 1990s
The Rise of Teen Idols in the 1990s
1990s Dance Music