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Notes on video lecture:
Country Rock's Influence on 1970s Music
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
London, emblematic, business, Funk, steel, excessiveness, Dylan, harmony, Johns, ambitious, juxtaposed, disco, Americana, Corner, Steely, Byrds, country, Glyn, punk, morphed, vocals, hippies, black, conservative, song, blues, red, safe, Frey, rock, Bad, acoustic, Fogerty
the idea of blending                music together with rock and roll at the end of the 1960s was kind of a bold thing to do
because in the United States country music was the music of relatively                         , what we would call today "       state" people
who had no respect or regard for                or hippy music and rock and roll
we often associate red state people with country music which is very much                      against rock
so when people like the            went to Nashville to record Sweetheart of the Rodeo in 1968
they were really doing something that no one thought of doing before
the idea of blending country music and country musicians with rock musicians
bands which combined country and         
The Byrds
The Band
1968: The Weight (took a load off Fanny)
1969: The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down
embraced country,                   , and Southern culture
Bob           
1969: Nashville Skyline
Crosby, Stills, and Nash
1969: Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
country influences
characteristics
        -oriented music
polished, lead             
rich, vocal harmonies
a lot of country touches
harmonica
           guitar
country rock was a reaction against the                            of psychedelic music
going back to                  sounds
going back to the roots
an embrace of Americana
this apparent simplicity seemed more honest and authentic to people
not full of studio trickery
was about a singer, a song, and acoustic instruments
precursor to country rock
Creedence Clearwater Revival
hard to classify them, like
Three Dog Night
Grand         
played an important role in rock history
came from San Francisco but was not representative in any way of the psychedelia that was going on there in late 1960s
John               
voice that sounded like it was somewhere between country-western music and           
many people thought he was           
1969: Proud Mary
1969:        Moon Rising
1969: Down on the             
Linda Ronstadt
You're No Good
The Eagles
there was no group who better wrapped up this country rock thing for the first half of the 1970s
no group that was more                      of country rock
some of them started as backup musicians to Linda Ronstadt
Glenn         
Don Henley
1971 broke off from Linda Ronstadt and formed their own group
she was supportive of this
a clear reference to The Birds
decided to embrace the country sounds
song oriented
emphasizes the vocals
like the Beatles
lush,                vocals
not a lot of fancy guitar playing
Southern influence mixed with that Southern California sounds
first couple albums produced by          Johns
didn't always get along with the band
British
worked with the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and the Who
recorded in             
1972 Take It Easy
banjo
lush harmony vocals
country twang to the lead vocal
1972 Witchy Woman
1972 Peaceful Easy Feeling
1973 Desperado
concept album of the Wild West
disappointing follow-up
1974 On the Border
decide they don't like Glyn           
want to be more rocky
Best of My Love
1975 One of Those Nights
1975 Lyin' Eyes
1975 Take It to the Limit
               into a different kind of group
Hotel California
The Long Run
characterized the second half of the 70s
trends
we can connect up music from the 1960s psychedelic era until the end of the 1970s around this idea of the hippy aesthetic
whether the groups were musically                    or relied more on simplicity
all of them embrace some aspect of this hippy aesthetic idea
first half of 1970s speciality styles coming out of psychedelia
also see the building of the music                 , getting bigger than anybody expected it to do
brings more money into the business
what had been a wider variety of styles in the beginning of the 1970s becomes more and more homogenized down into          bets of things that people know they can sell a lot of, synthetic music constructed for no other reason than to sell albums and tickets to concerts.
what grows out of this is (1)          rock which attempts to defeat both the hippy aesthetic and this kind of corporate rock, and (2)           , which, whether it wants to defeat the hippy aesthetic and corporate rock or not, stands in juxtaposition against it
technology is
what started at 4 tracks in the 60s becomes 8, 16, 32, and 48 by the end of the 70s
the musicians tend to fill them up with things
             Dan plays a big role in the development of sound

Flashcards:

person instrumental in bringing together rock and country, died young
Gram Parsons
lead singer of Creedence Clearwater Revival
John Fogerty
broke off from Linda Ronstadt to form Eagles
Glenn Frey, Don Henley

Ideas and Concepts:

From the strange bedfellows department via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "The idea of blending country music together with rock and roll at the end of the 1960s was a bold thing to do. The reason was that in the United States, country music was the music of relatively conservative, what we would call today "red state" people who had no respect or regard for hippies or hippy music or rock and roll whatsoever. So when the Byrds went to Nashville to record 'Sweetheart of the Rodeo' in 1968, they were doing something that no one had thought of doing before."
From the bands-that-are-hard-to-classify department, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "Creedence Clearwater Revival, just like Three Dog Night and Grand Funk, was a band that doesn't easily fit into our story of rock and roll, but nevertheless a group that played an important part in rock's history. They came from San Francisco but were not representative in any way of the psychedelia that was going on there in late 1960s. John Fogerty had one of the most unique voices in rock history which sounded country-western but was also deeply steeped in the blues, in fact, when only hearing his voice, most people assumed he was black."
From the best-of-genre bands department, via tonight's History of Rock and Roll class: "There was no group who better wrapped up this country rock thing for the first half of the 1970s, no group that was more emblematic of country rock at that time then The Eagles. Glenn Frey and Don Henley started as backup musicians to Linda Ronstadt but in 1971 broke off to form their own group which they called The Eagles, a clear reference to The Birds whose country rock format they were going to embrace:song-oriented music with lush, harmony vocals and not a lot of fancy guitar playing. Even though their music had Southern influence mixed with Southern California sounds, their first couple albums were produced in London by Glyn Johns, a British producer who had worked with the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and the Who. So when you hear early songs such as "Take It Easy" from 1972, remember that these songs were recorded not in sunny Southern California as their lyrics might imply, but in the foggy cold surrounding their London studio."
On the homogenization of music in the 1970s and the reaction against it, via this morning's History of Rock and Roll class: "We can connect up music from the 1960s psychedelic era until the end of the 1970s around this idea of the hippy aesthetic. Whether groups were musically ambitious or relied more on simplicity, most of them embraced some aspect of the hippy aesthetic idea that had been dominant throughout the sixties and widely celebrated in concerts such as Woodstock. While the first half of 1970s showed some specialty styles coming out of psychedelia such as Jazz Fusion, we mainly see throughout the 70s the building up of the music business, growing larger than anybody expected it to grow, which brought much more money into the business than there ever had been. A result of this was that the wider variety of styles that we saw at the beginning of the 1970s became more and more homogenized down into safe bets of things that people knew they can sell a lot of, synthetic music constructed for little other reason than to sell it in the form of albums and tickets to larger and larger concerts. The reaction to this was mainly (1) punk rock which attempted to defeat both the hippy aesthetic and this kind of corporate rock, and (2) disco, which, whether it wanted to defeat the hippy aesthetic and corporate rock or not, stood in juxtaposition against it."
1970s: Hippie Aesthetic, Corporate Rock, Disco, and Punk
British Blues-Based Bands and the Roots of Heavy Metal
American Blues Rock and Southern Rock
The Era of Progressive Rock
Jazz Rock in the 70s
Theatrical Rock: KISS, Bowie, and Alice Cooper
American Singer-Songwriters of the 70s
British and Canadian Singer-Songwriters
Country Rock's Influence on 1970s Music
Black Pop in the 1970s
Sly Stone and His Influence on Black Pop, Funk, and Psychedelic Soul
Motown in the 1970s
Philadelphia Sound and Soul Train
Blaxploitation Soundtracks
The Uniqueness of James Brown
Bob Marley and the Rise of Reggae
The Backlash Against Disco
1975-1980: The Rise of the Mega-Αlbum
Continuity Bands in the 1970s
Rock and Roll in the Second Half of the 1970s
U.S. Punk 1967-1975
1974-77: Punk in the UK
American New Wave 1977-80
British New Wave 1977-80
The Hippie Aesthetic: 1966-1980
The Rise of MTV
Michael Jackson: MTV's Unexpected Boon
Madonna as Disruptive Shock Artist
Prince and Janet Jackson
Other Groups Who Benefited from MTV
1980s New Traditionalists and New Wave
1980s New Acts, Old Styles and Blue-Eyed Soul
1970s Progressive Rock Adapts to the 80s
1980's Heavy Metal
1980s Heavy Metal and L.A. Hair Bands
1980s Ambitious Heavy Metal
The Beginning of Rap
1980s: Rap Crosses Over to Mainstream
Late 1980s Hard Core Rap
Punk Goes Hardcore
Late 80s Indie Rock Underground
1990s: The Rise of Alternative Rock
1990s Indie Rock and the Question of Selling Out
1990s Metal and Alternative Extensions
Hip-Hop in the 1990s
Classic Rock of the 1990s
1990s Jam Bands and Britpop
Female Singer-Songwriters of the 1990s
The Rise of Teen Idols in the 1990s
1990s Dance Music