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Notes on video lecture:
The Rise of MTV
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
tour, Canada, profits, 1980, Disco, pictures, 1979, Pittsburgh, buildings, London, FM, 1981, landscape, schools, advertising, staple, dedicated, Sarnoff, sharing, Buggles, get, municipalities, 1972, antenna, British, Corporate, Nesmith, entertainment, VCRs, States, broadcast, limited, boundaries, cable, homogenous, rock, artistic, paying, promo, home
on August 1,         , MTV launched its all-music, 24-hour cable TV
nobody had ever done anything quite like this before
an important moment in the history of          music
as MTV develops, it changes the music                   
the business of music
the ways people are able to        to music
in a way that the Internet and file                has changed the music business in a significant way
second half of 70s
rise of           
rise of Punk, which led to New Wave
continuation of bands which adapted to the more                      80s music format
                   Rock
often seen as lower quality music
but nevertheless has become a              of rock and roll until today
the origins of MTV
not in the music business at all
but in the cable TV business
to understand the history of MTV, we need to know the history of            TV
arose in places where regular television broadcasts via                were obstructed somehow
e.g. south of                      where there is a mountainous region
a valuable service to run a cable
economic and pragmatic benefit
also useful in cities where there are tall                   
provided premium entertainment
movies
special sporting events
normally you wouldn't get on                    television
we take this for granted today with the Internet
but this was even before people had         
the idea of seeing a movie in your own          without it being on broadcast television and interrupted by commercials, was unheard of
something that was entirely new and a service worth              for
         HBO
one of the first companies active in providing premium entertainment
Home Box Office
already active in 1972
an all movie and events channel
         ESPN
all sports
         CNN
24-hour cable news
1981 MTV
before you could find video DJs on cable
but this was the first channel                    exclusively to music 24-7
Saturday Night Live commercial
a cable TV company
they laughed at the idea back then of a 24-hour weather channel, 24-hour golf channel
cable was only in very                regions of the country
but people started to realize that if you had cable, you had many more options of                           
cities and                              were convinced to lay the cable in
so MTV starts with a relatively limited audience and begins to grow
when it was first developed, there were two                of thought on what that channel should be
1. Michael               
former Monkees guitarist
MTV should be channel that should show real                  content
give artists the ability to do things with video that would push the                     
2. others
MTV should be like radio with                 
use videos to promote records, sell                       , just like the FM stations do
similar to what David                did with TV after WWII
went with the commercial music broadcasting route
it wasn't seen at the beginning as a rival to      radio
but it turned out that it was
first problem
the availability of            videos
in the UK many bands made promo video
since UK countries were far apart
Australia
New Zealand
            
you make a video and send it
in the States, the approach was more to send the band on         
when MTV launched, they played
Video killed the Radio Star by the               
English new wave band formed in              in 1977 by singer and bassist Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoffrey Downes
they had a video at the right time
otherwise would never have become popular in the             
the first couple years there were mostly                bands on MTV for this reason
it was difficult to convince bands to invest money to create a music video
few people in the music business thought these videos were going to do them any good or make them               
not that many people had cable yet
1970s: Hippie Aesthetic, Corporate Rock, Disco, and Punk
British Blues-Based Bands and the Roots of Heavy Metal
American Blues Rock and Southern Rock
The Era of Progressive Rock
Jazz Rock in the 70s
Theatrical Rock: KISS, Bowie, and Alice Cooper
American Singer-Songwriters of the 70s
British and Canadian Singer-Songwriters
Country Rock's Influence on 1970s Music
Black Pop in the 1970s
Sly Stone and His Influence on Black Pop, Funk, and Psychedelic Soul
Motown in the 1970s
Philadelphia Sound and Soul Train
Blaxploitation Soundtracks
The Uniqueness of James Brown
Bob Marley and the Rise of Reggae
The Backlash Against Disco
1975-1980: The Rise of the Mega-Αlbum
Continuity Bands in the 1970s
Rock and Roll in the Second Half of the 1970s
U.S. Punk 1967-1975
1974-77: Punk in the UK
American New Wave 1977-80
British New Wave 1977-80
The Hippie Aesthetic: 1966-1980
The Rise of MTV
Michael Jackson: MTV's Unexpected Boon
Madonna as Disruptive Shock Artist
Prince and Janet Jackson
Other Groups Who Benefited from MTV
1980s New Traditionalists and New Wave
1980s New Acts, Old Styles and Blue-Eyed Soul
1970s Progressive Rock Adapts to the 80s
1980's Heavy Metal
1980s Heavy Metal and L.A. Hair Bands
1980s Ambitious Heavy Metal
The Beginning of Rap
1980s: Rap Crosses Over to Mainstream
Late 1980s Hard Core Rap
Punk Goes Hardcore
Late 80s Indie Rock Underground
1990s: The Rise of Alternative Rock
1990s Indie Rock and the Question of Selling Out
1990s Metal and Alternative Extensions
Hip-Hop in the 1990s
Classic Rock of the 1990s
1990s Jam Bands and Britpop
Female Singer-Songwriters of the 1990s
The Rise of Teen Idols in the 1990s
1990s Dance Music