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Notes on video lecture:
On Limitless Energy Resources and the Hegemony of Modern Time Schedules
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
national, government, organic, flourish, country, hour, delay, Greenwich, schools, changing, dogs, commercials, rhythms, giraffes, exponentially, roads, materials, 1784, cheap, ecosystem, justified, asteroid, transportation, incorrect, cities, seasons, nature, sapiens, increasing, extinct, ecosystem, year
the industrial revolution gave humankind control of enormous sources of energy and raw                   
this liberated humankind from its dependence on the surrounding                   , humans could now:
cut down forests and jungles
drain swamps
dam rivers
flood plains
lay down tens of thousands of kilometers of            and railroad tracks
build new and giant             
habitats were destroyed and animal and plan species went extinct
earth now has 7 billion                living on it
combined mass: 300 million tons
mass of all domesticated animals: 700 million tons
mass of all wild animals: less than 100 million tons
our children's books and TV screens are still full of giraffes, wolves and chimpanzees, lions and
but the real world has very few of them left
there are only 80,000                  in the world, compared to 1.5 billion domesticated cattle
there are only 200,000 gray wolves in the wild compared to 400 million domesticated         
there are only 250,000 chimpanzees compared to 7 billion homo sapiens
so it is clear that homo sapiens have taken over the world and we control it
the energy resources available to humankind are actually                      all the time and are likely to continue to do so
doomsday predictions about humanity running out of energy resources are probably                   
but the fear of humans destroying the ecology around them is far more                   
nature as such cannot be destroyed, species can become extinct, habitats can become totally different, but this is change, not destruction
65 million years ago, an                  from outer space hit the earth, wiped out the dinosaurs, and completely changed the ecosystem of the earth, opening the way forward for mammals
today, humankind is doing something similar: it is                  the ecosystem, driving many species to extinction, and it may even exterminate itself
however, there is likely to be many organisms that will continue to                  depending on the changes that are brought about, e.g. rats and cockroaches
perhaps in 65 million years, rats will evolve with some kind of intelligence and will look back thankfully to homo sapiens for bringing about the changes to the earth's                    that we did, just as we look back on the asteroid that destroyed the dinosaurs as a good change in the earth's ecosystem, not a bad change
but currently, there are few signs that humans will ever become               
the human population has been growing                            for centuries
1700: 700,000 humans
1900: 1,500,000,000 humans
2000: 6,000,000,000 humans
2014: 7,000,000,000 humans
while humans are becoming increasingly free from the forces of             , we are becoming increasingly subject to the forces of industry and                     
the industrial revolution opened the way to a long line of changes and experiments in social engineering, how humans live together in large groups
1. the replacement of                of tradition of agriculture
traditional agriculture depended on natural time and                growth
most societies cared about the natural cycles of day and night, the movement of the sun, and the changes of the               
for most of history, there was no such thing as a uniform, working day, that you do the same thing each day all          around
rather, the routines of humans changed from one season to another
people knew and cared about where the sun was in the sky, but they didn't care much about the          or the year
modern industry cares far less about the sun and the seasons and far more about uniform schedules that don't change from one season to the next
2. medieval worker created the whole shoe
today workers make small parts of products
time schedules
the schedule work day of factories was implemented in                to get people used to the uniform scheduling
time schedules are now a part of hospitals, prisons, transportation system, pretty much all aspects of modern life run according to precise time schedules
a crucial link in the spreading of time schedules was public                             
if workers need to get to the factory at a certain time, they need to get the train or the ferry at certain exact times
if there is a            in the public transport system, workers will be late for work, and production will be lower
this led to the appearance of precise time tables for public transportation
the first time table in British history was published in         , a time table of a carriage service with horses which connected certain cities
it specified only the hour of departure but not the hour of arrival
also, each city and town in those days had its own local time and the local time in Liverpool and Glasgow could be different than in London by up to half an hour
since there were no telephones or fast trains or cars, no one could know that there was a difference of time in various places, and nobody cared, what difference did it make?
when fast trains became common, it became a problem that different towns had slightly different times
1847 British train companies had a conference, they decided that all train tables would be given in the time according to                    observatories near London
in the following years, more and more institutions adopted Greenwich time as the official time
1880: British government made a law that all time tables in Britain must follow the one single time in Greenwich, it was the first time in history that an entire country adopted a                  time and obliged its population to live according to an artificial and distant clock, and not according to their local clock of sunrise and sunset cycles
eventually a global network of time tables was synchronized tighter and tighter down to an accuracy that can be measured in milliseconds
the industrial revolution produced            but precise clocks which then became ubiquitous
today, most families have more clocks at their disposal in their home than an entire medieval               
the typical person consults these clocks several dozen to several hundreds of times each day because almost everything we do, we do according to these precise time tables
we wake up to an alarm at exactly 7:00 AM, cook our breakfast in the microwave for exactly 50 seconds, catch our bus at exactly 7:45, our train at exactly 7:54, have meetings at exact hours throughout the day, run on the treadmill after work for exactly 30 minutes, come home to watch our TV show at exactly 7:00 PM which is interrupted by                        exactly every 10 minutes, each which last exactly 30 seconds, our entire day is run according to these precise time tables. And even when we go to our psychologist to complain about all of the stress we have in our lives, we have to arrive at exactly 11:30, the session lasts for exactly 45 minutes and after 44 minutes and 50 seconds, even if we are in the middle of the most exciting story about our mother, the therapist will say, 'That's it. We're running out of time. Let's continue this in the next session.'

Spelling Corrections:

astroidasteroid
millesecondsmilliseconds

Ideas and Concepts:

On the hegemony of modern time schedules in the Western world within the last 100 years, via today's History of Humanity class: "The average family today has more clocks in their house than an entire medieval country. We wake up to an alarm at exactly 7:00 AM, cook our breakfast in the microwave for exactly 50 seconds, catch our bus at exactly 7:45, our train at exactly 7:54, have meetings at exact hours throughout the day, run on the treadmill after work for exactly 30 minutes, come home to watch our TV show at exactly 7:00 PM which is interrupted by commercials exactly every 10 minutes, each which last exactly 30 seconds, our entire day is run according to these precise time tables. And even when we go to our psychologist to complain about all of the stress we have in our lives, we have to arrive at exactly 11:30, the session lasts for exactly 45 minutes and after 44 minutes and 50 seconds, even if we are in the middle of the most exciting story about our mother, the therapist will say, 'That's it. We're running out of time. We'll continue this in the next session.' I could go on with more and more examples but I don't have time."
The Context of History and Our Extended Human Family
How Walking Upright Led to Better Social and Cooperative Skills
The Importance of Fire and Cooking
Why Did Other Human Species Become Extinct?
The Cognitive Revolution and the Beginning of Human History
The Language of Homo Sapiens
How Fictive Language Enabled Larger Social Groups
The Power of Imagined Realities
How the Ability to Tell Stories Enabled Humans to Cooperate in Massive Groups
The Cognitive Revolution and the Variety of Human Communities
Spiritual Beliefs of Early Humans
Politics and Warfare of Pre-Agricultural Societies
45,000 Years Ago: Human's Decimation of Australia's Large Mammals
14,000 BC: Human Migration to the Americas
Agriculture: The Good and the Bad
10,000 BC: Agricultural Revolution
The Origins of Agriculture
The Code of Hammurabi and Other Imagined Realities
Inter-Subjective Reality and Romantic Consumerism
The Human Brain's Outsourcing of Mathematics
Unjust and Imagined Hierarchies
Imagined Hierarchies in History
Culturally Defined Gender
Three Theories of Gender Domination
The Direction of Humankind: Global Unity
The Essence of Money
The History of Money
The Historical Definition of Empire
The Relationship between Science, European Imperialism and Capitalism
Science, Capitalism and European Imperialism
Columbus: Last Man of the Middle Ages, Vespucci: First Man of the Modern Age
European Empires, Science, and Capitalism
How Capitalism is Based on Trust in the Future
On the Interdependence of Science and Capitalism
How Capitalism Enabled Small European Countries to Explore and Conquer the World
The Relationship Between Capitalism, the Slave Trade, and Free Market Forces
Industrialization, Energy and Raw Materials
The Second Agricultural Revolution and its Effect on Animal Treatment
The Ethics of Capitalism and Consumerism
On Limitless Energy Resources and the Hegemony of Modern Time Schedules
State/Market vs. Family/Community
Humankind's Rigid and Violent Past, and Flexible and Peaceful Present
Reasons for Our Current Unprecedented Era of International Peace
Three Theories on the History of Happiness
Psychological and Biological Happiness
Measuring Human Happiness
The Future of Cyborgs and Robots
What Do We Want to Want?