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Notes on video lecture:
Hazel Lavery and the Politics of Display
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
gender, outside, color, coyly, curiosity, hush, model, folded, story, woman, formal, shadow, stare, blue, triangular, aloft, anonymous, distant, 18th, 1909, stage, sexual, back, Paris, codified, flirtation, muse, wife, Morocco, costume, Ireland, outsiders, multitude, structural
the role the museum plays
museums display a           , a cultural narrative
stories of technical, stylistic, and              development
from religious art, to secular patronage, to the individualism of modern art
                 spaces for ritual comparable to churches or cathedrals
this provides a useful way to think about how we engage with art in such spaces
in          tones, treading quietly, looking up to admire worshipfully great works of art
art works are presented in a different way we engage with visual material in the                world
they are isolated and literally held            for our admiration and contemplation
what we are admiring is beauty
this is due to the fact that museums as a concept, emerge in late          century Europe, and are a testament to the aesthetic ideas of the Enlightenment
grouping artists in a shared space draws out shared qualities
subject matter
positioned above our eye level, these women never quite look          at us directly, instead, they look just past us, allowing us to look at them without reproach
these women are as decorative as the gilded frames in which they are displayed
John Lavery's painting In                (1913)
Hazel Lavery
another face among the                   
it is fitting that she is dressed in               
she is performing the role of            for her husband
she looks            at the viewer
there is a sense of the            about this work
the wall in the background enclosing the space
figures deliberately grouped in a                      shape
the blue parasol that frames Hazel's head draws our attention
echos the          sky around her daughter's head
creates a connection between the two women which is reaffirmed by the            of their dress
yet there is a difference between the direct            of Alice and Hazel's rather sideways glance
the difference between girl and            is spelled out
the lack of              awareness vs. seductive femininity
Hazel's face, half hidden in             , reveals little
she is a symbol of women of beauty in this work
she's merely a decorative figure
we can pass over her face without much                   , as easily as we look at the decorative embellishments on the horse's saddle
Hazel Lavery (1880-1935)
born in America
painter and the second          of the celebrated portrait artist Sir John Lavery
her likeness appeared on Banknotes of                for much of the 20th century
studied etching in           
1904 met John Lavery
         married
she was painted differently by John Lavery, with a more direct gaze compared to the gaze in In Morocco
1921 Hazel painted her husband
one of her few surviving paintings
if this hung next to In Morocco, her gaze may be read instead of as a coyful                     , an artistic eyeing-up
however, it was John and not Hazel who became the renowned artist
Hazel retired from art-making in favor of the role of society hostess, artistic         , and studio model
so Hazel's face recurs throughout John's paintings, but always as a sort of               , seductive beauty
Hazel's career              for the reason so many womens' careers folded throughout European art history
the difficult of facing a system in which women were                    in the world of art to be looked at but not expected to do the looking
it was a                      difficultly women faced in pursuing careers as artists
Hazel ended up playing the far more acceptable role of model to her artist husband
this path from artist to model wife was one that other women took as well
when we know their stories, see their work, and hear their voices, we see them differently than the                    beauties that decorate galleries and museums
the reading of artworks can change, depending on the environment we see them in, and the information we are presented with
the way we read              in spaces is a product of the space

Spelling Corrections:

patronidgepatronage

Ideas and Concepts:

On the museum as cultural holy place, via tonight's Sexing the Canvas course:

"Museums display cultural narratives, stories of technical, stylistic, and formal development, from religious art, to secular patronage, to the individualism of modern art. In this capacity, museums are codified spaces for ritual comparable to churches or cathedrals.

This provides a useful way to think about how we engage with art in such spaces. In hushed tones, treading quietly, looking up to admire worshipfully great works of art, we look upon these works presented in a different way than when we engage with visual material in the outside world:pieces of art are isolated and literally held aloft for our admiration and contemplation. What we are admiring is beauty.

This is due to the fact that museums, as a concept, emerged in late 18th century Europe and are a testament to the aesthetic ideals of the Enlightenment."
Tiepolo´s Cleopatra: Agency in Paint
The Political and Sexual Agency of Cleopatra
Gainesborough and 18th Century Effeminism
Soldiers, Chivalry, and Men of Feeling
Gainsborough's Portrait of Karl Friedrich Abel
The Ligoniers: The Tensions of Gender in Paint
Effeminacy and the Culture of Sensibility
Gainsborough's Cottage Door: Charity and Sensibility
Seduction in Boucher's pastoral paintings
Boucher's Madame de Pompadour: Controlling the Gaze
Rococo Eroticism in 18th Century Popular Culture
John Lavery in Morocco: Orientalism and the Academy
Hazel Lavery and the Politics of Display
Hilda Rix Nicholas in Morocco
The Dream by Henri Rousseau
Henri Rousseau's The Sleeping Gypsy
Restaging the Nude: Matisse's Dance
Cezanne’s Bather: Masculinity and Movement
Max Dupain (1911-1992): Australian Men on the Beach
Frida Kahlo's Fulang-Chang and I
Frida Kahlo: Self Portrait with Cropped Hair