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Notes on video lecture:
The Importance of Artist Communities and Networks
Choose from these words to fill the blanks below:
abstractions, Montmartre, modern, Rivera, arrived, Braque, Bateau, Holland, appreciated, collective, money, Oysters, flourish, longing, congratulation, misunderstood, feminist, just, ordinary
communities and networks
artists and creative people need communities and networks in order to                 
the history of much of modern art is a history of people who either found their community and their networks or they didn't
this wasn't always the case
Still Life with               , a Silver Tazza, and Glassware
Willem Claesz Heda, 1635
Netherlands
is painting in a world in which most of the people who look at the painting are going to agree that this is a valuable, desirable and maybe even          world
the middle class is rising into power in                in the 17th century
wealth and the ability to be successful in the world is founded upon trade and the ability to be able to manage           , and hard work
good food, beautiful glassware, lemons, oysters, all signs that you have                in the world of wealth through hard work
Heda knows who his audience is and paints for them
the audience knows how to read this work and there is mutual                             
the period with modern art is fraught with different kinds of stories
Oleanders
Vincent Van Gogh, 1888
Van Gogh is remarkable not for how well he fit into his world, but how well he didn't fit into his world
he's painting in the same still life genre as Heda 250 years early in which they both highlight and find beauty in                  things
the heroic myth of the                            genius, someone who didn't receive a lot of recognition during his lifetime even though many years after he died his painting became extremely valuable
during his lifetime, if you read his letters, he hear him                for just one other person to see the beauty in the colors he painted with and his obsessive working of surfaces
this is typical of artists who are pushing the boundaries of what is known and how things can be represented
Picasso and             
living together in tenement building in                     , Paris
Picasso from Spain, Braque from south of France to Bohemian culture
they found each other in Le             -Lavoir
Pablo Picasso, The Poet, 1911
Georgs Braque, Man with a Guitar, 1911
these paintings are more comfortable to look at as                         
when you say they are paintings of something, you have to do the work of figuring out the spatial relationships
they believed that Cubism was a new language of representation and to be a language, you needed at least one other person to speak it
husbands and wives in modern art
Diego             
1933: Man, Controller of the Universe
mural
Mexico City
painted on a monumental scale
bent upon taking on major themes of              life
married at the time
to artist
she had a tragic life
her place in art history was because she found her community
                 practice of art
theme: artists going after artists like them
a                      might be as small as two people or any size
husband and wife
group of sisters
helps an artist feel that their work is recognized and                        in his lifetime
artwork:
Still Life with Oysters, a Silver Tazza, and Glassware (1635)
Willem Claesz Heda
a painting which reflects the middle class having risen into power in Holland in the 17th century where wealth and the ability to be successful in the world is founded upon trade and the ability to be able to manage money, hard work
the good food, beautiful glassware, lemons, oysters, all signs that you have arrived in the world
most of the people who look at the painting are going to agree that this is a valuable, desirable and maybe even just world
Heda knows who his audience is and paints for them
#..#stilllifewithoysters
Oleanders (1888)
Vincent Van Gogh
a painting that shows the same still life genre as Heda 250 years early in which they both highlight and find beauty in ordinary things, yet Van Gogh is remarkable not for how well he fit into his world, but how well he didn't fit into his world
heroic myth of the misunderstood genius, someone who didn't receive a lot of recognition during his lifetime even though many years after he died his painting became extremely valuable
during his lifetime, if you read his letters, he hear him longing for just one other person to see the beauty in the colors he painted with and his obsessive working of surfaces
this is typical of artists who are pushing the boundaries of what is known and how things can be represented
#..#oleanders

Spelling Corrections:

tenamenttenement
rigourousrigorous

Ideas and Concepts:

Heard in this morning's History of Art for Artists and Gamers class: "I became interested in teaching MOOCs not necessarily because I wanted to speak to tens of thousands of people at once, although if there are tens of thousands of you out there, then I'm very excited to speak with you. But I became interested in MOOCs because I know profoundly that in order for artists and creative people to succeed in the world, they need find like-minded people to talk to, in order to share their visions, to ask them questions, and to bounce their ideas off of. Artists and creative people need communities and networks in order to flourish. The history of much of modern art is a history of people who either found their community and their networks, or they didn't."
On artists and their worlds, via this morning's History of Art for Artists and Gamers class: "Van Gogh painted in the same still life genre that Willem Claeszoon Heda painted 250 years early in which both artists highlight and find beauty in ordinary things, yet while Heda is remarkable for how well he fit into his world, Van Gogh is remarkable for how well he didn't fit into his world. In his paintings, Heda reflects the values of a middle class having risen into power in Holland in the early 17th century where wealth and the ability to be successful in the world is founded upon trade and the ability to manage money, and so good food, beautiful glassware, rare lemons, and oysters are all signs that you have arrived in this world. Van Gogh, on the other hand, is typical of the modern artist pushing the boundaries of how things can be represented, longing for just one other person to see the beauty in the colors he painted with and his obsessive working of surfaces."
Via this morning's History of Art for Artists and Gamers class: "Picasso and Braque were living together in a tenement building in Montmartre and found each other at the Bateau-Lavoir, and it's a good thing they did because they both believed that Cubism was a new language of representation and to be a language, you needed at least one other person to speak it. When you look at these paintings, you have to feel pretty convinced of their project in order to even see the poet or the Portuguese man sitting in a chair and still believe that these paintings have some relationship to a real world of observation. In a lot of ways, these paintings are more comfortable to look at as abstractions, and the minute you say they are really paintings of something, then you need to do the work of figuring out the spatial relationships, figuring out the kind of notational system that was used to make them, and understand the degree to which they were pushing representation into the abstract. For Picasso, Braque was a tremendous validator of his practice, and likewise for Braque. Each evening they could go to each others' studios and ask, what do you think, can you still see the world in the this painting? Famously, in retrospect, Braque described himself and Picasso as two mountain climbers roped together in a heroic task of bringing a rigorous, analytic mind to the project of representation."
Artists and their Contexts Throughout History
The Importance of Artist Communities and Networks